For information on the following topics, please click below:

Elbow

Elbow Bursitis

This is a swelling of a fluid-filled sac in the back of your elbow. This sac is called the “olecranon bursa.” You have similar sacs near other large joints throughout your body. They act as cushions between your bones and your soft tissues. Normally they have a small amount of fluid inside them. But sometimes they can swell. That is called “bursitis.”

Lateral Epicondylitis (Tennis Elbow)

This condition, commonly called tennis elbow, is an inflammation of the tendons that connect the muscles of the forearm to the elbow. The pain is primarily felt at the lateral epicondyle, the bony bump on the outer side of the elbow.

This condition, commonly called golfer’s elbow, is an inflammation of the tendons that connect the muscles of the forearm to the elbow. The pain is primarily felt at the medial epicondyle, the bony bump on the inner side of the elbow.

Foot and Ankle

Ankle Sprains

Ligaments are fibrous, elastic bands of tissue that connect and stabilize the bones. An ankle sprain is a common, painful injury that occurs when one or more of the ankle ligaments is stretched beyond the normal range of motion. Sprains can occur as a result of sudden twisting, turning or rolling movements.

Ankle Tendonitis (Peroneal Tendonitis)

This condition is an inflammation of one or both peroneal tendons, which travel down the lower leg, behind the lateral malleolus and along the outer side of the ankle.

This condition is an injury to the navicular, one of the tarsal bones of the mid-foot. This type of injury is common in athletes, particularly those who participate in high-impact sports that require jumping, sprinting and sudden directional changes. Track and field athletes are particularly susceptible.

Plantar fasciitis is an irritation of the plantar fascia. This thick band of connective tissue travels across the bottom of the foot between the toes and the heel. It supports the foot’s natural arch. It stretches and becomes taut whenever the foot bears weight.

Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Foot and Ankle

Rheumatoid arthritis (we call it “RA”) is a chronic disease. It affects joints throughout your body. It commonly starts in your hands or feet. For many people, it causes problems in the feet and ankles.

Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

Stress fractures are one or more tiny cracks in a bone. These fractures are common in the legs and feet. That’s because your legs and feet have to support your weight and absorb the forces of walking, running and jumping.

General Body

This is a chronic pain disorder. It affects the muscles and the connective tissue (called the “fascia”) that surrounds them. With this syndrome, you may develop sensitive areas on your body called “trigger points.” When these places are pressed or stressed, you feel pain. This condition can affect muscles throughout your body.

Hand

Pain, numbness and tingling in your hand may be from carpal tunnel syndrome. It happens when the area around the main nerve to your hand is too tight. The nerve is called the median nerve. And the small space in your wrist where it passes is called the carpal tunnel.

Rheumatoid arthritis, a condition that can attack joints throughout the body, commonly affects the joints and surrounding tendons of the wrist and fingers. It can cause the joints to become swollen, painful and possibly deformed. This can interfere with normal hand function. It can significantly impact a person’s quality of life.

Stenosing Tenosynovitis

This condition, also called stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, is an inflammation of the sheath that wraps around the tendons at the thumb side of the wrist.

Trigger Finger

This common condition, also known as stenosing tenosynovitis, is a narrowing of a portion of the tendon sheath in the finger or thumb that interferes with normal finger movement. This condition most commonly affects the ring finger, but can affect any digit. It is more common in middle-aged women, but anyone can be affected, even newborns.

Hip

Hip Bursitis

This is an irritation or swelling of the trochanteric bursa. This small, fluid-filled sac is found on the outer side of the femur. It acts as a cushion for the iliotibial band, a thick tendon in your leg.

Hip Impingement (FAI/CAM)

This is a problem with the hip joint. In a healthy hip, the ball of the femur is smooth and round. It fits perfectly into the hip socket. But with this condition, the ball, the socket or both the ball and the socket are shaped poorly. They don’t fit together well. When you move your hip, they rub together harmfully.

Hip Labral Tears

If your hip joint hurts, or if it catches or clicks when you move your leg, you may have a torn labrum. That’s a rim of tissue that surrounds the hip’s socket. It helps to deepen the socket and cushion the joint. A torn labrum can keep the hip joint from working smoothly.

Knee

This bulge, also called a “popliteal cyst,” forms behind the knee. It’s a swollen bursa. A bursa is a fluid-filled sac that helps reduce friction between soft tissues and bones. There are several of these sacs in the knee and in other joints. A swollen bursa can be uncomfortable, or even painful.

This is a swelling of a fluid-filled sac called a “bursa.” It’s on the inner side of your knee, between the tibia and the tendons that attach to your hamstring muscle. You have similar sacs near other large joints throughout your body. They act as cushions between your bones and your soft tissues. Normally they have a small amount of fluid inside them. But sometimes they can swell. We call that “bursitis.”

Lateral Collateral Ligament (LCL) Injury

This is a stretching or tearing of a ligament on the outer side of your knee. The lateral collateral ligament, commonly called the “LCL”, connects the femur to the fibula. The LCL helps stabilize your knee. This ligament, along with the medial collateral ligament, helps prevent excessive side-to-side movement of your knee joint. It helps keep the upper and lower leg aligned properly.

Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injury

This is a stretching or tearing of a ligament on the inner side of your knee. The medial collateral ligament, commonly called the “MCL”, is connected to the femur and to the tibia. The MCL helps stabilize your knee. This ligament, along with the lateral collateral ligament, helps prevent excessive side-to-side movement of your knee joint. It helps keep the upper and lower leg aligned properly.

Meniscus Tear

This is a common injury of the knee. Your knee joint is cushioned by two c-shaped wedges of cartilage called the “menisci.” Each individual cushion is called a “meniscus.” This injury is a tear of one of these cushions.

Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative arthritis, is a gradual breakdown of cartilage in the joints. Cartilage is a tough, flexible connective tissue that protects the ends of bones in the joints. Osteoarthritis is common in the knees because the knees bear the weight of the body. Osteoarthritis of the knee can severely impact a person’s lifestyle.

Patella Tracking Disorders

This is a problem with the alignment of the patella (the bone at the front of the knee, commonly called the “kneecap”). With this disorder, the patella shifts out of its normal track as you bend or extend your knee.

Viscosupplementation for Arthritis of the Knee

This is an injection of medicine into the knee joint. It lubricates your knee so the bones can glide smoothly. It can help lessen the pain of arthritis.

Shoulder

Arthritis of the Shoulder

Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative arthritis, is a gradual breakdown of cartilage in the joints. Cartilage is a tough, flexible connective tissue that protects the ends of bones in the joints. Osteoarthritis of the shoulder can severely impact a person’s lifestyle.

Biceps Tendonitis

This is a problem with a tendon in your shoulder. Most often, it’s the “long head of biceps” tendon. It travels from the front of your upper arm to the top of your shoulder socket. With this condition, the tendon becomes painfully inflamed or irritated.

Bursitis of the Shoulder (Subacromial Bursitis)

This is a swelling of a fluid-filled sac called the “subacromial bursa.” It’s in the shoulder, between a bony protrusion called the “acromion” and the rotator cuff. You have similar sacs near other large joints throughout your body. They act as cushions between your bones and your soft tissue. Normally they have a small amount of fluid inside them. But sometimes they can swell. We call that “bursitis.”

Rotator Cuff Injuries

The rotator cuff muscles and tendons hold your upper arm bone in your shoulder socket. A hard fall, repetitive arm motions or problems with the structure of your shoulder can injure the rotator cuff.

Shoulder Dislocation

The shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint. The ball of your upper arm bone fits into a socket in your shoulder blade. If the ball slips out, your shoulder has “dislocated.”

Shoulder Labral Tears (SLAP Lesions)

This condition is a tear of the labrum in the shoulder joint. The labrum is a ring of cartilage around the shoulder socket that stabilizes the head of the humerus. A SLAP tear occurs at the point where the biceps tendon attaches to the labrum.

Systemic and Genetic Disorders​

Fibromyalgia

This chronic condition is believed to be a type of interference with the way your brain processes pain signals. It leaves you highly sensitive to pain. If you have this condition, you may feel long-lasting pain throughout your body.

Our Services

Dr. Carter has an excellent safety record and has taught injection techniques all across the country.

Dr. Carter’s PRP protocols are backed by the latest scientific data.  Her pre-and post injection protocols are unique and specifically tailored to the individual patient’s goals and objectives.

Fitness and sports enthusiasts of all levels, from weekend warriors to professional athletes have benefited under Dr. Carter’s care.  Performing artists with career-threatening injuries have been able to return to their profession with Dr. Carter’s holistic approach to treatment. 

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